Agenda2019-01-20T19:58:59+00:00

Conference Schedule and Agenda

AGC’s 2019 Conference on Surety Bonding and Construction Risk Management will feature four plenary sessions and twenty breakout sessions on a total of sixteen topics. Also included in the schedule of events are two receptions, two breakfasts, one lunch and a total of six breaks. Everything will begin with a plenary session running from 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Monday, January 28, and everything will end with a plenary session running from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 30. Below are the details.

4:30 PM 6:00 PM Plenary Session

how the overall economy and the construction, surety and insurance industries performed in 2018, including any trends to watch over the course of the coming year

William McConnell, The Vertex Companies
Steven Weisbart, Insurance Information Institute

This session will begin with the key indicators of U.S. economic performance in 2018, including gross domestic product, corporate profits, consumer confidence, unemployment and wage rates, household debt, inflation, interest rates and the federal deficit. The session will continue with the key indicators of the construction industry’s recent performance, including construction starts, spending, employment and costs, and breakdowns for each of the industry’s major segments. Hoping to paint a complete picture of the current economic environment, the session will then turn to the surety and insurance industries, including surety and insurance premiums, rates, losses and loss ratios, surplus and portfolio yields. Along the way, the speakers will identify significant trends and other things to watch over the course of the coming year.

Calusa Ballroom
6:00 PM 7:00 PM Opening Reception
Sponsored by:

Waterfall Pool
7:00 AM 8:00 AM Breakfast
Sponsored by:

Calusa Terrace
8:00 AM 9:20 AM Plenary Session

the current risk environment and both the causes and the effects of an increase in the number of construction contractors assembling in-house design teams

Ryan Howsam, FMI Corporation
Joe Poliafico, Flatiron Constructors
Douglas Maibach, Barton Malow Company
Jim Kerns, Parsons Corporation
Ron Robey, Smith Currie & Hancock

AGC and FMI have just compiled the results of their 2019 survey of the risk environment in the construction industry. This session will begin with the most significant of those results, which include the following:

• construction contractors’ strategies for managing the top risks for today and tomorrow;
• the tools and technology that contractors are using to manage risk;
• how contractors are preparing for an economic slowdown; and
• a continuing increase in the number of contractors assembling in-house design teams.

From several perspectives, this session will then explore the last of these four items. Leading contractors in the heavy-civil and building sectors of the construction industry, a leading design firm and a seasoned construction lawyer will share their perspectives on both the causes and the effects of this trend. What are the opportunities – and the problems – that such teams create? How are contractors using these teams? What are the upsides and the downsides for the risks that inhere in fixed-price, construction management, design-build and other construction contracts?

Calusa Ballroom
9:20 AM 9:40 AM Break
Sponsored by:

Calusa Foyer
9:40 AM 10:40 AM Breakout Session 1A

how to meet the new or increased challenges for crisis management plans, including active shooters, risk of fatalities and addressing the media

Tyler Henson, J.E. Dunn Construction
Eric Zuhkle, J.E. Dunn Construction

The current news cycle reveals all too clearly that situations involving hostile intruders, active shooters, and violent employees are on the rise. However, those situations are only one part of the broader and inherently important concept of crisis and emergency management and preparedness. These issues extend to the construction world in unique and complex ways that must be considered by all members of the industry. This session will highlight the journey of one general contractor from a place of relative complacency to a state of recurring vigilance, flexibility and adaptability. Attendees will appreciate the value of emphasizing your company’s crisis and emergency response plan and preparedness and the ever-changing and dynamic nature of the threats. Plus, the discussion leaders will present ideas on crisis response best practices as well as the way they manage what might be the most important tool in any crisis situation: a clear internal communication strategy.

Estero A
9:40 AM 10:40 AM Breakout Session 1B

the many potential causes of confusion about “delegated design,” why the parties to that delivery system to address each of them and practical guidance for everyone involved

Greg Chertoff, Peckar & Abramson
Christian Jahrling, Turner Construction Company
Alberto Franceschet, Permasteelisa North America
Robert Barbera, Turner Engineering Group
Stephen Weinryb, HOK

While growing in popularity, the “delegated design” system for delivering major components of many construction projects remains poorly understood. Just what is what “delegated design”? How does it differ from “design-assist” and other services that the design and construction industries continue to describe in similar ways? What are its pros and cons for each of the parties to a project? Why is it becoming the norm for many scopes? And where and how can it go wrong? This session will feature a spirited discussion of these and other questions surrounding “delegated design.” The speakers will include a leading general contractor, a sophisticated specialty contractor, a leading design firm and a construction lawyer steeped in these issues. The moderator will be the head of the same contractor’s engineering group. Their common goal is to help everyone avoid the misunderstandings that can turn “delegated design” into costly disaster. To that end, they will clarify the process and how it should work, and explore the implications for each of the parties’ insurance and other risk management programs.

Estero B
9:40 AM 10:40 AM Breakout Session 1C

the confusion and uncertainty surrounding employer rights and obligations

Howard Mavity at Fisher & Philips

As they enter 2019, construction contractors find it harder and harder to manage drug use in the workplace. Society is becoming more accepting of medical and recreational marijuana use and states are passing new laws in an effort to protect employees who make “legal” use of medical and perhaps recreational marijuana. Meanwhile, after 16 years of decline, the examples of the clearly unlawful use of drugs in the workplace are increasing. Heroin, cocaine, and other drugs have reappeared. Until 2018, the courts had uniformly held that employers could require employees to report to work free from marijuana and could take adverse action against employees who violated such a rule. In 2018, three states’ courts then held that some of the newer state laws on medical marijuana protect employees from such a rule, creating great concern about all of the new state laws on medical marijuana, which exceed 33. This session will cover the changing legal landscape and trends in the unlawful use of drugs and provide practical guidance for contractors trying to determine what their next steps should be.

Estero C
9:40 AM 10:40 AM Breakout Session 1D

what happens when the experts subject the workers comp claims data derived from the construction industry to the rigors of modern data analytics

Mark Moitoso, Lockton Companies
Paul Primavera, Lockton Companies
Kristen Weber, BE&K Building Group

More Info Coming Soon!By all accounts, the construction industry needs to find some way to address its shortage of craft labor. That will be hard and for many reasons. One of the more important is that, notwithstanding its investments in safety and health, the construction industry still has room to improve its reputation for protecting its craft workers and fairly managing their workers comp claims. Looking for answers, many have studied the loss data derived from the construction industry. But only recently have the experts started to subject that data to the rigors of modern data analytics, producing new and truly neutral insights into the traditional strategies for avoiding losses and managing claims. Which (if any) of those strategies have had a measurable impact? What are some of the strategies that companies may need to reconsider? And what would be the challenges to implementing changes? This session will separate fact from fiction, pouring the foundation for a more informed approach to safety, health and workers comp claims management.

Great Egret
10:40 AM 11:00 AM Break
Sponsored by:

Estero Foyer
11:00 AM 12:00 PM Breakout Session 2A

how to meet the new or increased challenges for crisis management plans, including active shooters, risk of fatalities and addressing the media

Tyler Henson, J.E. Dunn Construction
Eric Zuhkle, J.E. Dunn Construction

The current news cycle reveals all too clearly that situations involving hostile intruders, active shooters, and violent employees are on the rise. However, those situations are only one part of the broader and inherently important concept of crisis and emergency management and preparedness. These issues extend to the construction world in unique and complex ways that must be considered by all members of the industry. This session will highlight the journey of one general contractor from a place of relative complacency to a state of recurring vigilance, flexibility and adaptability. Attendees will appreciate the value of emphasizing your company’s crisis and emergency response plan and preparedness and the ever-changing and dynamic nature of the threats. Plus, the discussion leaders will present ideas on crisis response best practices as well as the way they manage what might be the most important tool in any crisis situation: a clear internal communication strategy.

Estero A
11:00 AM 12:00 PM Breakout Session 2B

the many potential causes of confusion about “delegated design,” why the parties to that delivery system to address each of them and practical guidance for everyone involved

Greg Chertoff, Peckar & Abramson
Christian Jahrling, Turner Construction Company
Alberto Franceschet, Permasteelisa North America
Robert Barbera, Turner Engineering Group
Stephen Weinryb, HOK

While growing in popularity, the “delegated design” system for delivering major components of many construction projects remains poorly understood. Just what is what “delegated design”? How does it differ from “design-assist” and other services that the design and construction industries continue to describe in similar ways? What are its pros and cons for each of the parties to a project? Why is it becoming the norm for many scopes? And where and how can it go wrong? This session will feature a spirited discussion of these and other questions surrounding “delegated design.” The speakers will include a leading general contractor, a sophisticated specialty contractor, a leading design firm and a construction lawyer steeped in these issues. The moderator will be the head of the same contractor’s engineering group. Their common goal is to help everyone avoid the misunderstandings that can turn “delegated design” into costly disaster. To that end, they will clarify the process and how it should work, and explore the implications for each of the parties’ insurance and other risk management programs.

Estero B
11:00 AM 12:00 PM Breakout Session 2C

the confusion and uncertainty surrounding employer rights and obligations

Howard Mavity at Fisher & Philips

As they enter 2019, construction contractors find it harder and harder to manage drug use in the workplace. Society is becoming more accepting of medical and recreational marijuana use and states are passing new laws in an effort to protect employees who make “legal” use of medical and perhaps recreational marijuana. Meanwhile, after 16 years of decline, the examples of the clearly unlawful use of drugs in the workplace are increasing. Heroin, cocaine, and other drugs have reappeared. Until 2018, the courts had uniformly held that employers could require employees to report to work free from marijuana and could take adverse action against employees who violated such a rule. In 2018, three states’ courts then held that some of the newer state laws on medical marijuana protect employees from such a rule, creating great concern about all of the new state laws on medical marijuana, which exceed 33. This session will cover the changing legal landscape and trends in the unlawful use of drugs and provide practical guidance for contractors trying to determine what their next steps should be.

Estero C
11:00 AM 12:00 PM Breakout Session 2D

what happens when the experts subject the workers comp claims data derived from the construction industry to the rigors of modern data analytics

Mark Molitoso, Lockton Companies
Paul Primavera, Lockton Companies
Kristen Weber, BE&K Building Group

By all accounts, the construction industry needs to find some way to address its shortage of craft labor. That will be hard and for many reasons. One of the more important is that, notwithstanding its investments in safety and health, the construction industry still has room to improve its reputation for protecting its craft workers and fairly managing their workers comp claims. Looking for answers, many have studied the loss data derived from the construction industry. But only recently have the experts started to subject that data to the rigors of modern data analytics, producing new and truly neutral insights into the traditional strategies for avoiding losses and managing claims. Which (if any) of those strategies have had a measurable impact? What are some of the strategies that companies may need to reconsider? And what would be the challenges to implementing changes? This session will separate fact from fiction, pouring the foundation for a more informed approach to safety, health and workers comp claims management.

Great Egret
12:00 PM 1:00 PM Lunch
Sponsored by:

 Calusa Terrace
1:00 PM 2:00 PM Plenary Session

the fundamentals of blockchain technology, the business practices that it appears likely to change and how it could change them

Andrew Lindsey, Alpha Corporation
Stephen Buonpane, Chubb Construction Major Accounts

Confidence and trust in the data and other information that the many (and often unfamiliar) parties to a construction project have to exchange with each other is very important. That information is frequently high in value and/or proprietary. But rarely is it completely transparent and traceable. And that fact increases the risk of fractured communications and misunderstandings that can, in turn, increase costs and lead to disputes. What if the parties could weave a trustworthy infrastructure for information management into the very fabric of their communications? That would be a “blockchain world” taking advantage of a broad range of new technologies ready to revolutionize information management. This session will begin with the fundamentals of these new technologies and then explore the various ways that they are likely to change the construction industry’s current practices, including the places where that change is likely to begin. The possibilities run the gamut, from project planning and design, to contract negotiation and administration, to the procurement and proof of insurance coverage, to proof of claims, and beyond.

 Calusa Ballroom
2:00 PM 2:20 PM Break
Sponsored by:

Calusa Foyer
2:20 PM 3:20 PM Breakout Session 3A

how it can help contractors mitigate if not head off problems and expedite the resolution of any disputes

Brandon Howell, Layton Construction Company

All too many construction projects lead to expensive disputes over delays, disruptions and the like. Recognizing that fact, this session will dig into one of the readily available but often underutilized tools for addressing the root causes of such disputes and expediting their resolution. As the speaker will explain, CPM (Critical Path Method) scheduling can help contractors do much more than plan their work. During construction, it can also help them identify problems in the making. After the fact, it can also provide them with an accurate history of a project, including any impacts that the project did experience. The speaker will explain how to make the most of CPM scheduling, exploring the best ways to organize, manage and use that process. Along the way, he will also underscore the data that is most important for contractors to monitor and the steps necessary to create and maintain accurate records of the many things that go into the process. Going beyond the theory of CPM scheduling, the speaker will include real world examples of where and how it can make a difference.

Estero A
2:20 PM 3:20 PM Breakout Session 3B

the many questions surrounding the “joint check rule,” the agreements intended to address those questions and the bankruptcy law that can also come into play

Mary Joanne Dowd, Arent Fox
Kim Gessner, Moss & Associates
Aaron Blankenship, Travelers Indemnity Company

Joint checks and joint check agreements are widely used throughout the construction industry to mitigate the risk that a subcontractor will fail to meet its obligations to its (lower tier) subcontractors and/or suppliers. Indeed, they seem to be the starting point for every subcontractor risk mitigation plan! They are not, however, something that general contractors (GCs) and construction managers (CMs) can take for granted. This session will explain the reasons why and suggest practical strategies for limiting the risk of a problem. It will begin the “joint check rule,” which different states apply in different ways and over half the states have either rejected or neglected to address. The session will then address the joint check agreements intended to fill the holes in that rule, providing tips for drafting such agreements (which can actually increase the risk of liability, if poorly drafted). Finally, the session will turn to bankruptcy law, explaining how it can frustrate even a well drafted agreement and suggesting alternatives may fare better than the agreements that GCs and CMs typically seek.

Estero B
2:20 PM 3:20 PM Breakout Session 3C

a survey and discussion of the thorny questions that surround the insurance coverage and contracts for modular construction

Robert Haskell, AXA XL
Melissa Lesmes, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman
Ron Ciotti, Hinckley, Allen & Snyder

Modular construction promises to cut costs and improve quality, and thus far, it has delivered on enough of that promise to grow in popularity. But thorny questions continue to surround it. The unfortunate truth is that modular construction straddles the fuzzy lines between “product” and “work,” and “goods” and “services.” At times, it also causes construction projects to straddle the lines between or among different states. Construction, surety and insurance professionals, and the lawyers that serve all three, can identify the “prevailing” answers to most of these questions but they find it much more difficult to predict how any one scenario will play actually play out. Acknowledging that fact, the speakers will strive to suggest practical strategies for tilting the odds in your favor. They will explore builders risk, CGL and professional liability coverage for modular construction, and the warranties, security interests and other contractual issues that modular construction raises. They will also address the many questions surrounding the transportation of the modular components of a new structure and how to allocate and otherwise manage the related risks of loss or liability.

Estero C
2:20 PM 3:20 PM Breakout Session 3D

Michael Davis, Zurich North America

Several warning signs for today’s construction contractors lie in the large claims that they have filed for professional liability coverage over the last twenty years. The goal of this session is to identify and share those warning signs, and to that end, the speaker will dig into five of these claims and provide statistical overviews of the remainder. His case studies will include instructive examples of concurrent causation, rectification, (head-scratching) human error, construction management (supposedly) not-at-risk and protective indemnity. His statistical overviews will provide insights into the multiple lines of coverage that large claims are likely to implicate, the differences in risk for different delivery systems, the drivers of large claims (which may or may not be the professional services that trigger them) and the generally riskier situations. Along the way, he will address the differences and interactions between and among the distinct coverages for professional liability, such as protective indemnity and rectification. Construction contractors cannot avoid any and all mistakes. The can, however, avoid disasters!

Great Egret
3:20 PM 3:40 PM Break
Sponsored by:

Estero Foyer
3:40 PM 4:40 PM Breakout Session 4A

how it can help contractors mitigate if not head off problems and expedite the resolution of any disputes

Brandon Howell, Layton Construction Company

All too many construction projects lead to expensive disputes over delays, disruptions and the like. Recognizing that fact, this session will dig into one of the readily available but often underutilized tools for addressing the root causes of such disputes and expediting their resolution. As the speaker will explain, CPM (Critical Path Method) scheduling can help contractors do much more than plan their work. During construction, it can also help them identify problems in the making. After the fact, it can also provide them with an accurate history of a project, including any impacts that the project did experience. The speaker will explain how to make the most of CPM scheduling, exploring the best ways to organize, manage and use that process. Along the way, he will also underscore the data that is most important for contractors to monitor and the steps necessary to create and maintain accurate records of the many things that go into the process. Going beyond the theory of CPM scheduling, the speaker will include real world examples of where and how it can make a difference.

Estero A
3:40 PM 4:40 PM Breakout Session 4B

the many questions surrounding the “joint check rule,” the agreements intended to address those questions and the bankruptcy law that can also come into play

Mary Joanne Dowd, Arent Fox
Kim Gessner, Moss & Associates
Aaron Blankenship, Travelers Indemnity Company

Joint checks and joint check agreements are widely used throughout the construction industry to mitigate the risk that a subcontractor will fail to meet its obligations to its (lower tier) subcontractors and/or suppliers. Indeed, they seem to be the starting point for every subcontractor risk mitigation plan! They are not, however, something that general contractors (GCs) and construction managers (CMs) can take for granted. This session will explain the reasons why and suggest practical strategies for limiting the risk of a problem. It will begin the “joint check rule,” which different states apply in different ways and over half the states have either rejected or neglected to address. The session will then address the joint check agreements intended to fill the holes in that rule, providing tips for drafting such agreements (which can actually increase the risk of liability, if poorly drafted). Finally, the session will turn to bankruptcy law, explaining how it can frustrate even a well drafted agreement and suggesting alternatives may fare better than the agreements that GCs and CMs typically seek.

Estero B
3:40 PM 4:40 PM Breakout Session 4C

a survey and discussion of the thorny questions that surround the insurance coverage and contracts for modular construction

Robert Haskell, AXA XL
Melissa Lesmes, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman
Ron Ciotti, Hinckley, Allen & Snyder

Modular construction promises to cut costs and improve quality, and thus far, it has delivered on enough of that promise to grow in popularity. But thorny questions continue to surround it. The unfortunate truth is that modular construction straddles the fuzzy lines between “product” and “work,” and “goods” and “services.” At times, it also causes construction projects to straddle the lines between or among different states. Construction, surety and insurance professionals, and the lawyers that serve all three, can identify the “prevailing” answers to most of these questions but they find it much more difficult to predict how any one scenario will play actually play out. Acknowledging that fact, the speakers will strive to suggest practical strategies for tilting the odds in your favor. They will explore builders risk, CGL and professional liability coverage for modular construction, and the warranties, security interests and other contractual issues that modular construction raises. They will also address the many questions surrounding the transportation of the modular components of a new structure and how to allocate and otherwise manage the related risks of loss or liability.

Estero C
3:40 PM 4:40 PM Breakout Session 4D

Michael Davis, Zurich North America

Several warning signs for today’s construction contractors lie in the large claims that they have filed for professional liability coverage over the last twenty years. The goal of this session is to identify and share those warning signs, and to that end, the speaker will dig into five of these claims and provide statistical overviews of the remainder. His case studies will include instructive examples of concurrent causation, rectification, (head-scratching) human error, construction management (supposedly) not-at-risk and protective indemnity. His statistical overviews will provide insights into the multiple lines of coverage that large claims are likely to implicate, the differences in risk for different delivery systems, the drivers of large claims (which may or may not be the professional services that trigger them) and the generally riskier situations. Along the way, he will address the differences and interactions between and among the distinct coverages for professional liability, such as protective indemnity and rectification. Construction contractors cannot avoid any and all mistakes. The can, however, avoid disasters!

Great Egret
6:00 PM 7:00 PM Mid-Week Reception
Sponsored by:

Banyan Courtyard
7:20 AM 8:20 AM Breakfast
Sponsored by:

Calusa Terrace
8:20 AM 9:20 AM Breakout Session 5A

Jeff Vita, Saxe, Doernberger & Vita

As the insurance industry continues to modify and adjust the scope and other details of the insurance coverage that it offers to general contractors (GC) and construction managers (CM), the courts also continue shape that coverage. The goal of this session is to identify the most significant questions that the courts have addressed in the last year and explain the rationale for their conclusions. How does a wrap up exclusion affect the additional insured coverage that an unenrolled subcontractor has provided to a GC or CM working under an OCIP? Have any courts recently bucked the relatively new majority rule that defective workmanship is an “occurrence” that can trigger CGL coverage? How strictly will the courts construe the privity language that limits additional insured coverage to parties “with whom” the named insured has a written contract? Does a statutory demand for repairs trigger an insurance carrier’s duty to defend? Can an allegation that a GC or CM has negligently hired, supervised or retained an intentional wrongdoer trigger CGL coverage? And, in a world where deductibles, SIRs and limits on CGL coverage are all “per occurrence,” how many “occurrences” are attributable to work that causes property damage in different places and at different times? The speaker will share the answers to these questions and discuss the implications GCs and CMs across the country.

Estero A
8:20 AM 9:20 AM Breakout Session 5B

how seasoned surety underwriters describe and assess the risk profiles of these projects

Ed Reilly, American Global
Geoff Delisio, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance, Surety
Dave McVicker, Zurich Surety
Chris Murphy, Travelers Bond

As gap financing and other innovations – such as public-private partnerships – have taken root, the number of complex construction projects has greatly increased. During this session, underwriting executives for several of the leading sureties will share their unique insights into these projects and how well they have performed. The speakers will also share their insights into the risk profiles for these projects and any areas of particular concern. At the end, they will also question whether the surety industry has the appetite and capacity to support a great many more of these projects and discuss the reasons why it may or may not. The session will begin with a brief overview and history of the relatively recent innovations that support these projects and provide time for attendees’ to ask any follow-up questions they may have.

Estero B
9:20 AM 9:40 AM Break
Sponsored by:

Estero Foyer
9:40 AM  10:40 AM Breakout Session 6A

the several different ways to structure and capitalize a captive, the different ways that contractors are using them, a deep dive into how well group captives have recently performed . . . and a quick look at what lies ahead

Jerry Ouimet, Cobb Strecker Dunphy & Zimmermann, Inc.
Lindsay Chase, Innovate Captive Strategies

This session will begin with an overview of the several different ways to structure the ownership and control of a captive, and to capitalize such an organization, including the pros and cons of each option. Then it will turn to the different ways that contractors are using these organizations and explore the recent data on the performance of group captives in the construction industry. Along the way, the speakers will touch on the regulation of captives and identify the specific business objectives that captives can help contractors achieve, such as driving home the competitive advantage of working safely, stabilizing if not lowering the overall cost of risk, documenting the cost of retaining risk and deferring income taxes. The speakers will also share their experience with the different ways that contractors are using different captives. And they will end with a quick look at what lies ahead. Are you contemplating a captive? Are you beginning to wonder what to do with the one you already have? Are you looking for evidence of what a captive can accomplish? If so, this session is likely to be one for you.

Estero A
9:40 AM 10:40 AM Breakout Session 6B

advances in information technology, new paradigms and the related opportunities for better assessment of counterparty (owner, joint venture and subcontractor) risk

Douglas Schrift, Aon
Justin Levine, TradeTapp by BuildingConnected
Michael Ho, Bespoke Metrics
Gregory Horne, Liberty Mutual Surety

The leaders in the field of information technology are not content to streamline and otherwise improve the prequalification process. They are also striving to enhance the business insights that the process generates. And construction contractors are beginning to take note. Their paradigms are beginning to shift. But how quickly and completely contractors will embrace and integrate the new solutions remains far from certain. Understanding that fact, two of the firms pushing the envelope and a representative of the surety industry will share their candid assessments of the challenges for the industry. What are the current limitations and latest advances in the technology driving the new solutions? What are the potential barriers to their widespread acceptance? What are the steps necessary to harness their value? What is the strategy most likely to effect change? This session will provide an opportunity for everyone to listen, learn and share their own insights into where and how the new systems and data will test the industry.

Estero B
10:40 AM 11:00 AM Break Calusa Foyer
11:00 AM 12:00 PM Plenary Session

the folders, settings and tools that anyone can use to process and organize their email more efficiently

Steve Turner, Turner Time Management

Email may not be the bane of everyone’s existence. But it is certainly the bane of those getting too much – and finding the time required to manage that email goes up and up. What is urgent? What is important? What is both? Where is the one that arrived yesterday and still needs a response? Where is the one with the document that just became critical to my claim? The immediate goal of this session is to help everyone manage their email better. The larger goal is to increase the time that everyone has for other things. The speaker will identify and explain the most efficient ways to process and organize email, including the Outlook folders that everyone needs to create and the settings and tools that most professionals can put to better use. Along the way, the speaker will also touch on the times and occasions when email is probably not the best way to communicate with someone. Time is precious commodity. Come learn how to add at least a few minutes (and perhaps much more) to every work day!

Calusa Ballroom